Technique

  • Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 2

    Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 2

    Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 2
    In the previous lesson Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 1 exercises using the G major scale in 1 static position were shown. These guitar scale exercises outlined the scale broken into different intervals and steps. In this guitar lesson we will use the same exercises but with a 3 octave pattern moving across the fretboard in various positions.

    Even more so in the last lesson watch the fingering to ensure that the scales are played effectively especially when changing position. Practice them slowly at first then increase in tempo with a metronome or drum machine. A beginning tempo of 80bpm is recommended.
    As previously mentioned learning the pattern for the major scales also covers the 7 modes of the major scale. Read More

  • Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 1

    Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 1

    As a lead guitarist you’re expected to know many guitar scales and their patterns in various keys all over the fretboard. The best way to really get guitar scales under your fingers is to practice them broken into various intervals and steps. Practicing scales this way will help you learn the fretboard patterns and fingerings for them. It also helps to train your ears to hear the note intervals in a scale too. Plus these exercises can also be used to form part of your improvised solos.
    The first examples use the G major scale in 1 static position. Watch the fingering following the principle of 1 finger per fret to ensure that they are played effectively. Practice them slowly at first then increase in tempo with a metronome or drum machine. A beginning tempo of 80bpm is recommended. Read More

  • 11 Best Intermediate Acoustic Guitar Songs To Learn – Part 2

    11 Best Intermediate Acoustic Guitar Songs To Learn – Part 2

    In the part 1 of 11 Best Intermediate Acoustic Guitar Songs To Learn we looked at songs with bar chords, syncopated muting strumming, arpeggios and fingerpicking. Here the list of intermediate acoustic songs to learn continue with these acoustic classic rock hits.
    Blackbird – The Beatles
    Another popular song with my students this fingerpicking classic uses a pedal tone throughout on the G string. The chord shapes use just 1 or 2 fingers based on 10th intervals (a root note and a 3rd an octave up). Use the thumb and fingers 1 and 2 to pluck throughout.

    Tears In Heaven – Eric Clapton
    This ballad from Clapton’s unplugged album has some very nice fingerstyle playing. Read More

  • 11 Best Intermediate Acoustic Guitar Songs To Learn – Part 1

    11 Best Intermediate Acoustic Guitar Songs To Learn – Part 1

    If you’ve been playing acoustic guitar for a while and are comfortable with strumming open string chords (A D E G and C etc) challenge yourself by learning some intermediate level songs. These songs should include more challenging guitar techniques such as bar chords, arpeggios, riffs, syncopated rhythms and fingerpicking. Here are 11 of the best intermediate acoustic guitar songs to learn.
    Space Oddity – David Bowie
    This song has a gazillion (lots anyway) chords with a few bar chords including F Fm and Bb. The more challenging part here is the rhythmic bar chord section using the 4 bar chords C F G and Am which happens after the lyrics “planet earth is blue and there’s nothing I can do”. Read More

  • 8 Great Rhythm Guitar Jam Ideas – Part 2

    8 Great Rhythm Guitar Jam Ideas – Part 2

    The previous guitar lesson Part 1 – 8 Great Rhythm Guitar Jam Ideas focused on 16th notes to match the drum hi-hat groove and power chords. Here the examples start with power chords then move onto other ideas using a cleaner guitar tone to get the creative juices flowing.
    Example #5 simply uses power chords to create accents similar to what you would hear in a typical AC DC or The Who song. Try moving the timing of the A power chords to create different rhythms.

    Jam Rhythm #5 | Download
    Listen to the audio of Jam Rhythm #5.

    This example base on an A minor arpeggio sounds clearer with a clean guitar tone. The slower 8th notes of the arpeggio create a nice rhythmic contrast to the faster 16th note rhythms of the drums. Read More