Technique

  • Want Sexier Guitar Solos?

    Want Sexier Guitar Solos?

    Want to make your guitar solos more expressive, exciting and sexy? Simple! Use the following techniques:

    Hammer Ons
    Pull Offs
    Slides
    Bends
    Vibrato

    Without these techniques your guitar solos can sound dull, mechanical and not very musical at all – about as sexy as a electronic door bell chime! Listen to the following short solo using the A minor pentatonic scale with these missing elements to hear how unappealing it can sound.

    Unsexy Solo | Download
    Unsexy Solo.

    Now we will cover each technique adding them to the solo step-by-step to make the music more expressive and sexy.
    Hammer Ons
    A hammer on is where the first note is plucked with the guitar pick then the second is played by the fretting hand ”hammering on” the fretboard. Read More

  • Surprisingly Slick 6ths Licks

    Surprisingly Slick 6ths Licks

    If you’re sick of the same single note guitar solo licks try surprising yourself and others with some slick 6ths notes played as double stops. A 6th is where the 2 notes are played 6 notes apart from each other in a scale. For example a C and an A note form a 6th as A is 6 notes away from C in a C major scale.
    These double stops 6ths are 2 strings apart meaning that if you’re playing the notes simultaneously with a pick you have to mute the unwanted middle string with the edge of the fretting finger. Alternately you can pluck the 2 strings required to play the 6th with your fingers.

    6th | Download
    Listen to the audio of The 6th.

    Blues Intro Lick
    One of the most commonly played licks using 6ths is this blues intro lick based around the E major chord. Read More

  • Double Trouble with Double Stops

    Double Trouble with Double Stops

    Want an easy way to double your guitar solo notes? Double stops will get you out of trouble! Double stops on guitar are when 2 strings are ‘”stopped” by the fingers to play 2 notes together. The most famous guitarist who uses double stops extensively was Chuck Berry. Many of his tunes including the hit song Johnny B Goode use double stops in the intro and throughout. Double stops can help to vary your lead guitar playing by adding 2 note chords (AKA Dyads) to your solos. In this guitar lesson we will look at several ways you can use double stops in your lead guitar playing.
     
    Chuck Berry Riffs
    One of the most famous riffs in rock n roll is the intro to Johnny B Goode. This riff features a repeated double stop that is slid into on the first 2 strings. Read More

  • Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 2

    Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 2

    Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 2
    In the previous lesson Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 1 exercises using the G major scale in 1 static position were shown. These guitar scale exercises outlined the scale broken into different intervals and steps. In this guitar lesson we will use the same exercises but with a 3 octave pattern moving across the fretboard in various positions.

    Even more so in the last lesson watch the fingering to ensure that the scales are played effectively especially when changing position. Practice them slowly at first then increase in tempo with a metronome or drum machine. A beginning tempo of 80bpm is recommended.
    As previously mentioned learning the pattern for the major scales also covers the 7 modes of the major scale. Read More

  • Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 1

    Think You Know Your Scales? Think Again! – Part 1

    As a lead guitarist you’re expected to know many guitar scales and their patterns in various keys all over the fretboard. The best way to really get guitar scales under your fingers is to practice them broken into various intervals and steps. Practicing scales this way will help you learn the fretboard patterns and fingerings for them. It also helps to train your ears to hear the note intervals in a scale too. Plus these exercises can also be used to form part of your improvised solos.
    The first examples use the G major scale in 1 static position. Watch the fingering following the principle of 1 finger per fret to ensure that they are played effectively. Practice them slowly at first then increase in tempo with a metronome or drum machine. A beginning tempo of 80bpm is recommended. Read More